Garden of Images: Mother-Brother-Sister Mandala

This is one of my favorite mandalas. I drew it just after a visit from my mother and brother — the nuclear family I grew up with. We each live in different cities (and on different coasts) and hadn’t been together in the same place for at least three years.

Image of a mandala divided into three parts, each with a tree on a hill that shows both branches and leaves: in one, a stick figure rolls down a hill in the sunshine; in another, a stick figure stands under a tree with wiggly lines radiated outward; in a third, a stick figure stands under a night sky under a full moon
Wednesday, March 5, 2014: The day after my family leaves. The first time we have all been in the same room together in years–

 

Garden of Images – Women’s Circle Seaside Retreat Mandala

I drew this mandala during a seaside retreat with the Women’s Sacred Circle in Maine this September. We were there during the autumn equinox (Mabon in the Wiccan calendar) and it was a pretty magical weekend. The last morning I was there, I took my final swim of the season. The water was so cold I got pins and needles, but it was worth it.

Scan of a mandala drawn at a retreat with the women's sacred circle
Women’s Circle Retreat at Ferry Beach, Maine, September 2014

Garden of Images – Imperfection Mandala

Most of my mandalas are far from perfect, but this one is more imperfect than most. I decided to embrace that imperfection instead of starting again. This is also one of the dangers of using a smaller sketchbook.

I don't know what perfect means / I choose not to know
I don’t know what perfect means / I choose not to know

Garden of Images – Egg Moon Mandala

I often draw mandalas. Here’s one I drew in March of 2014, around the time of the Egg Moon — the same month that holds Passover and Easter in the Judeo-Christian calendar, and around the time of Nowruz, the Persian New Year. In the Wiccan Wheel of the Year, it’s known as Ostara, a festival of the Germanic Goddess of the same name in which eggs and rabbits figure prominently. All these holidays share the themes of rebirth and renewal, a theme that is self-evident to anyone who’s lived through springtime in a temperate (or colder!) climate.

scan-mandala-pregnant-web